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UPDATED: How Did Grayslake Schools Perform on Standardized Tests?

The Illinois State Board of Education recently released its annual school report cards.

Editor's Note: Test scores for Avon Center School were incorrectly reported in the original posting of this story. The results have been corrected. Patch regrets the error.

The Illinois State Board of Education just released its annual school report cards, which grades the performance of every school in the state.

It also provides information on average ACT and Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) scores for high schools, and the average Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) scores for middle and elementary schools. You can see the results for all of the schools in our area in Patch's searchable database.

Adequate Yearly Progress

The report card also shows whether a school or district made annual yearly progress, or AYP, toward state learning goals. This year's state benchmark was 85 percent of students meeting or exceeding the standards in both math and reading.

Both Grayslake Central and Grayslake North high schools failed to make AYP in reading and math.

At Grayslake Central, 67.9 percent of students met or exceeded state standards in reading, while 66.4 percent of students met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Grayslake North, 61.4 percent of students met or exceeded state standards in reading, while 67.9 percent of students met or exceeded state standards in math.

However, both high schools were above the state averages of 50.7 percent of students meeting or exceeding reading standards and 51.6 percent of students meeting or exceeding math standards.

While standardized tests are a part of what determines AYP, it's not the total picture. Under the No Child Left Behind Act, several subgroups are factored into a school and district's performance, including: economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, limited English proficient, students on free or reduced lunch and more.

Here are some highlights from our local schools:

At Avon Center School, 87.1 percent of third-graders and 87.8 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Frederick School, 87 percent of fifth-graders and 92.1 percent of sixth-graders met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Grayslake Middle School, 87.8 percent of seventh-graders and 91.5 percent of eighth-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading, while 89.1 percent of seventh-graders met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Meadowview, 91.5 percent of third-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading, while 98.8 percent of third-graders met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Park East, 93.3 percent of third-graders and 93.2 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards in math.

At Park West, 87.7 percent of fifth-graders, 94.2 percent of sixth-graders and 92.4 percent of eighth-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading. In math, 85.2 percent of fifth-graders, 87.2 percent of sixth-graders and 94.9 percent of seventh-graders met or exceeded state standards.

At Prairieview, 85.3 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading. In math, 89.9 percent of third-graders and 89.6 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards.

At Woodview, 85.6 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading. In math, 94.3 percent of third-graders and 92.3 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded state standards.

At Prairie Crossing Charter School (PCCS) had high marks across the board. Meeting or exceeding state standards in reading were: third-graders (90.7 percent); fourth-graders (97.7 percent); fifth-graders (93.2 percent); sixth-graders (95.2 percent); seventh-graders (95.3 percent); and eighth-graders (100 percent).

PCCS students meeting or exceeding state standards in math were: third-graders (95.3 percent); fourth-graders (100 percent); fifth-graders (95.5 percent); sixth-graders (97.6 percent); seventh-graders (100 percent); and eighth-graders (100 percent).

At Woodland Elementary School in District 50, 89.9 percent of third-graders met or exceeded state standards in reading.

Woodland 2012 State Report Cards now online

How Did Your Schools Do on the State Standardized Tests?

Terri November 19, 2012 at 06:06 PM
Little tricky, Jim. The biggest flaw in this mandate is the testing process. There are students that don't even speak English required to take the tests. Others with learning disabilities, even physical disabilities that prevent them from performing also required to take the tests. The raw average AYP number is hardly representative of the educable masses.
Jim Jensen November 20, 2012 at 02:33 AM
I disagree. My wife is in Special Education in another district; she cannot get a position in GL as she has no connections to key staff members that control hiring. It is not your talents are or how well you practice your profession, it's WHO you know--and that is my point. We are plagued with conflicts of interest and outright corruption--yes, I said it. If a child cannot speak English, culpability falls back to the staff and their management--mostly the latter. With management staff making over $100 k /year, proper English should be taught to ALL children, regardless of cultural background or primary language. In exchange for these resources, we receive excuses, rationalizations, rhetoric and requests for more to do less. We have lost the desire to distinguish between right and wrong, how to treat one another with respect and caring, globally exchanged by the pursuit of wealth and status. All licensed professionals, myself included, are public servants. We should serve proudly, endeavor to make a difference each and every day by touching the lives of others in a positive manner, instead of rationalizing away the morals, passions and scruples that started us down the road to our professions in the first place.
Terri November 20, 2012 at 03:50 AM
You start by saying the BOE should be accountable and then you get all ethereal. And how dare you blame staff or mgmt for the students inability to speak English.
Jim Jensen November 20, 2012 at 05:24 AM
I didn't just dare, I set it to writing. and it seems I hit a nerve. If you are a teacher, then teach. You expect as much for your own family, so do unto others... If you go to a hospital in need of medical assistance, you have a reasonable expectation that the designer made the facility safe, just like we did your classrooms, auditorium and field house. In kind, when we send a child to school there are certain reasonable expectations or a 'standard of care' professionals are held to. In the latter case however, there is no accountability. You can't be sued for teaching error, but you can sue the architect for design error. So we have come full circle then--where is the accountability for the school dictrict and reasonable results of professional services? Answer: There is none, but there should be according to professional edict; therefore, the BOE as governing body should be held accountable. "make no small plans as they have no magic to stir mens' blood"
Terri November 20, 2012 at 12:59 PM
Sir To use your hospital analogy, you're blaming the doctors and staff for your being sick? Take better care of yourself, eat right, get support from family and friends. And when you do get sick, the hospital can help. This started with the NCLB mandate for AYP. Students go to school hungry, cold, and ill-prepared randomly throughout the school year. They don't speak English, but worse yet, they cannot read or write in their native languages because their parents wrongly believe its counter productive. While they learn these new skills, mandates require they be tested as if they already have them; hence, the low AYP's. I am not a teacher, but I believe a little bit of Burnham guides them all.

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